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20121201
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in my lifetime with respect to broad openings in china. a, diplomatic openings. the ones who want to recognize china will abide by the one china policy. the economic doors that have taken china to a relatively small economy to the second largest in the world. and 3, primacy of the party with its 80 million members and 3000 outposts in the world. now you have xi jinping rising to power. he has been given the party mantle and soon the military and the presidency. before him will be new questions much different from the ones that deng xiaoping was responsible for acting upon. before xi jinping will be questions like, is china more repressive at home today than in earlier years. is china more nationalistic in its economic practices, but jiggly those among the enterprises? has china become more assertive internationally? i would argue east of these questions carried fairly profound rule of law implications. as xi jinping rises to take the top position in china and wrestles with new challenges and attempts to answer any questions, i would argue that many of them are based in basic rule
will look at the new communist party of leadership in china and that impact on u.s.- china relations. hosted by the center for strategic and international studies in washington, this is an hour. i'd also like to recognize former ambassador to china jim sasser who's sitting right there, one of my close friends. thank you for coming, senator. glad to see you. well, the panel is a really good one, kurt campbell, assistant secretary of state for east asia and pacific affairs. he became -- came to that job in 2009, previously the ceo and co- founder of the center for a new american security. he was a professor at harvard, associate professor of public policy and international relations at the kennedy school. chris johnson, senior adviser and freeman chair in china studies here at csis. his most important public service, as far as i'm concerned, is he gave me a lot of help in preparing for the presidential debate. and i'll be -- always be grateful for that, chris. he's frequently advised senior white house, cabinet, congressional, military and foreign officials on chinese leadership and on beijing
and partners such as singapore and the philippines and expanding our dialogue in exchanges with china. we are also an handed our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes -- expanding our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes allocating our naval fleet to have a 60/40 split between the pacific and atlantic oceans, increasing army and marine presence in the region. locating our most advanced aircraft in the pacific, including new deployments of f- 22's and the mv22's to japan. and lay the groundwork for the first overseas deployment of the f-35 joint strike fighter. the third element of our strategy is that as we do force projection in the asia-pacific and middle east, we still have to maintain our global leadership and presence by building innovative partnerships and partner capacity across the globe and using these innovative rotational deployment as a way to do exercises and training with other countries, developing their capabilities so they can provide for their own security. in latin america, africa, europe, and elsewhere. the past decade of war has rein
also have an economic competitor and a partner in china. they have a voracious appetite for natural resources and we're looking at new ways to get these in our own backyard, and maybe i will ask you this question, admiral. how important is the china factor in america energy program's going forward? >> i will talk to doubt, but i would like to mention a few puffs things about this report that may not have come out in your opening remarks. we definitely advocating opening of drilling in the united states where we cannot, but there is a very strong part of this report that says it has to be done safely and we know how to do it safely. that is one contribution of those of us who have served in the armed forces, we do a lot of dangerous stuff in the armed forces, fuel, nuclear power, explosives. the way we do that safely is a high standards, rigid enforcement, and very professional inspectors to do it. we strongly recommend applying this model to regulatory body so that we can do this safely, so that we can do oil retractions safely. that we can do safely. the general and i live in penns
deficit to china being $29.8 billion per month. that is just one country. you start to add up all the trade deficit that we have with all of these different trading partners over the years, i am sure that it is close to about $1 trillion per year. >> thank you for the comments. let's go to sarasota next. caller: good afternoon. the way that i look at it, as a 74-year-old professional pharmacist with a minor in economics, the reason i am independent is because republicans and democrats cannot seem to get it together. the biggest problem that we have now is the reason why we cannot do what we are supposed to do for the entire country. one middleman adnan grover norquist. someone who was never even elected. here is a man that has caused all the problems. all of the republicans have signed this pledge, which to me is unconstitutional. without him, we would not be talking today. >> salem, oregon, republican line. you are on the air. caller: good morning. as a college student, and i have listened to every single caller, this is an embarrassing day for our country. i am a first-time job
not create any jobs. as far as china is concerned we do not hit that high of a tariff on their imports. i believe it is a lot higher. the whole thing was steve jobs. he treated the apple computer in his garage. when he got successful theme of his company over to china giving chinese people jobs. if steve jobs was born in china he would not even be able to create the apple computer. we just do not do enough for the people of this country. the people who are position to create jobs do not reinvest in the country. i do not think they should get tax breaks. if you want to give these corporate giant tax breaks given to those who want to invest in the country and create jobs. for a lower than the american businessmen. guest: i understand your frustration. part of it is the corporate tax .ode clearly needs to fix it a lot talk about fixing a and a revenue neutral way. it does not help lowering future deficits any easier. there are some things need to change. in general we need to realize that if we set our country on the bike path making the right investments in -- the right path making investme
talks about the role of la in china. -- rule of law in china. >> washington worked his way up. at the urging of one of his brothers he immigrated out west where the lead mine industry was in may paid a. he arrived in a ship, by stagecoach. he arrived on steamboat in this muddy town. he established a lot have been in slowly worked his way up. he became a very successful lawyer and then became involved politically. he ran for congress, search for eight terms. in any profession did abraham lincoln -- served for eight terms. as they arised, they were a close colleague during the civil war. after grant was elected president, initially appointed washburn secretary of state. at that time he became very ill. his family actually feared for his life. after about 10 days he submitted his resignation to president grant. grant accepted his resignation. over the next several months he regained his health which was always very fragile. he then offered him the position as minister of france. >> michael hill on the minister to france during the 1870 franco-prussian war. they provide political
's a nixon-to-china thing. >> right. it's a different sensibility and -- >> confidence about that. >> right. again, i think we as democrats need to be very careful to think this is over with latinos. it's not. i think the playing surface is a beneficial one to the democrats right now and i think there's plenty of work. >> sorry. >> but the work needs to continue to solidify that. they -- this is an electorate that is too diverse. there's generational change happening in it. you need to stay engaged. you need to -- you know, those 800,000 to a million hispanics who are aging into the electorate need to be reached out to, need to be cultivated, need to be worked, you know, quite frankly, by both parties. i'm hoping the republicans won't. [laughter] as a partisan. and then there is this question and i don't know -- i don't think the research has been done yet and roberto can correct me if i'm wrong here, in terms of this kind of millennial question. >> yes. >> the latino electorate is young and getting younger, and the question is how -- are they going to behave like millennials? quite frankly
standard of living. a list of such changes is long, but its start in asia with the rise of china and india -- but it starts in asia with the rise of china and india. at the center of this pivot is china, which exits as an adversary and a fellow traveler, ensuring mutual goals -- in sharing mutual goals -- as a fellow traveler, sharing mutual goals. this will impact american relations with the rest of asia and may even help determine prospects for peace or war. in visiting thailand and the philippines in october, i was reminded of the economic vitality of southeast asia and the fact that that tend countries comprise an asean represent now the fourth largest export market of the united states. these countries are center stage. we must stand firm with our friends throughout asia and actively pursue prospects for free trade and open sea lanes and other policies that will strengthen american economic growth. more broadly, we face the specter of global resource constraints, especially efficiencies of energy and food that could stimulate conflict and deepen poverty. we have made startling gains i
because of huge interest rate risks and currency rates over time. and in china, they're looking for corporate bonds and alternative investments rather than u.s. treasury securities. so we are living on borrowed time. we've created another bubble and my view is the reason the fed's doing that is because marathon update has changed in the late 70's to where they have to concerned with short-term employment and the absence of the congress and the president work together to get a fiscal deal, they're the only game in town. we need a fiscal deal and the fed has to change kits policies because both are imprune and unsustainable over time. >> right. >> one of the most successful fiscal consolidations in the developed democratic world in the mid 1990's, and i frequently asked canadian politicians how did you do it? the americans went from cheering on spend and to the torrances of deficits within a matter of a year or two. and so the government in canada now with some peril if they don't balance their budgets and the answer you most frequently get is all they have to do was say at 40% of
where we can solve the whole immigration problem. people say, how do we compete with china? we can have the entire world at our disposal and start businesses. then we have to focus on tax and the corporate tax reform to get a system that is simpler and makes it easier for businesses to compete in the world. that will be enormous. there is an infrastructure investment that needs to be made. this is important with the budget deal going forward. we have to think about what our values are. we can spend money on infrastructure to make investments in the future rather than having short-term spending. support for basic research and for higher education, as drew talked about. tell us what is and we can plan around it with respect to health care costs and energy costs. then it businesses can create a renaissance of american competitiveness. >> i think that is a brilliant agenda. i don't think that has changed. let's assume we go through the fiscal cliff. immigration, investments. you are not going to do a dream act. we had a chance to do it. george bush, john mccain. maybe the republicans learne
writing their highs the rails. you can move across china throughout their many provinces of high-speed rail. we do not have it happen to have it. we are not even close to it. if it is going to happen, it has to happen with the leadership of you. thank you for listening to me. thank you for all the work you do. i am welcome to any questions. >> thank you. i do not think we will question you. i will ask unanimous consent that she is extended courtesy to sit on our panel after other members have been heard, you will have the opportunity to participate. without objective, -- objection, so ordered. >> thank you. >> i will say two things. you asked about the caucus. i do not make many pledges. but i did make a pledge when i first ran not to join caucuses. >> working group, then. >> i spent part of my career dismantling committees that have grown into huge prophecies -- huge bureaucracies. i cannot do that. i can tell you i will be focused on two projects. one will be high-speed rail in the northeast corridor, whatever it takes. thank you. we will let you go. we will have a vote. we wil
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12